Applied Economics

Filtering by: Applied Economics
Resource Development on First Nation Lands, APEC 2660
Jan
14
to Jan 18

Resource Development on First Nation Lands, APEC 2660

In this course students will examine the fiscal and economic impacts on First Nations of existing or proposed resource projects within their territories. It also covers how First Nations can successfully negotiate agreements and mediate disputes to maximize the benefit of these agreements for their communities. Topics include an introduction to resource economics; fiscal and economic impacts of resource projects; environmental review of resource projects; and resource project interest-based negotiation and dispute resolution. The course incorporates examples and case studies of actual First Nation resource agreements and disputes. It culminates in a First Nation resource project negotiation simulation and role play. 
3 credits. Prerequisites: Communications, Taxpayer Relations and Dispute Resolution or Service Agreements and Joint Contracts or Residential and Commercial Development on First Nations Lands or Investment Facilitation on First Nation Lands.

This is an on-campus class in Kamloops, BC. 

This is the fourth course of the Certificate in First Nation Applied Economics program

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First Nation Fiscal Relationship and Economic Development, APEC 2670
Feb
25
to Mar 1

First Nation Fiscal Relationship and Economic Development, APEC 2670

Students will examine how current First Nation fiscal relationships limit economic growth and development in their communities and the changes that can be made to current public finance policies and systems to address this concern. Students will be introduced to the key knowledge and skills necessary to participate in negotiating a new First Nation fiscal relationship and to help successfully implement it in their communities. Topics include public finance in Canada; the history of the First Nation fiscal relationship; problems with the First Nation fiscal relationship; options to improve the First Nation fiscal relationship; and First Nation and other government public finance and fiscal interests. The capstone of the course is a First Nation fiscal relations negotiation simulation and role play.
3 credits. Prerequisites: Introduction to Basic Economics or both ECON 1900 and ECON 1950

This is an on-campus class in Kamloops, BC.

This is the fifth course of the Certificate in First Nation Applied Economics program

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Investment Facilitation on First Nation Lands, APEC 2650
Apr
30
to May 4

Investment Facilitation on First Nation Lands, APEC 2650

Students study the interests of public and private investors and what can be done to attract investment on First Nation lands. Given that is it four to six times more expensive to facilitate investment for First Nation projects, emphasis is placed on solutions to reduce investment transaction costs. Topics include transaction costs and economic growth; the legal and administrative framework to facilitate investment; building infrastructure; and creating an investment facilitation work plan.
Pre-requisite: ECON 122 or ECON 1221
Co-requisite: APEC 2630

This is an on-campus class in Kamloops, BC

This is the third course in the Certificate in First Nation Applied Economics program.

 

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RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT ON FIRST NATION LANDS, APEC 2660
Feb
5
to Feb 9

RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT ON FIRST NATION LANDS, APEC 2660

In this course students will examine the fiscal and economic impacts on First Nations of existing or proposed resource projects within their territories. It also covers how First Nations can successfully negotiate agreements and mediate disputes to maximize the benefit of these agreements for their communities. Topics include an introduction to resource economics; fiscal and economic impacts of resource projects; environmental review of resource projects; and resource project interest-based negotiation and dispute resolution. The course incorporates examples and case studies of actual First Nation resource agreements and disputes. It culminates in a First Nation resource project negotiation simulation and role play. 
3 credits. Prerequisites: Communications, Taxpayer Relations and Dispute Resolution or Service Agreements and Joint Contracts or Residential and Commercial Development on First Nations Lands or Investment Facilitation on First Nation Lands.

This is an on-campus class in Kamloops. 

This is the fourth course of the Certificate in First Nation Applied Economics program

 

 

 

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FIRST NATION FISCAL RELATIONSHIP AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT, APEC 2670
May
8
to May 12

FIRST NATION FISCAL RELATIONSHIP AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT, APEC 2670

Students will examine how current First Nation fiscal relationships limit economic growth and development in their communities and the changes that can be made to current public finance policies and systems to address this concern. Students will be introduced to the key knowledge and skills necessary to participate in negotiating a new First Nation fiscal relationship and to help successfully implement it in their communities. Topics include public finance in Canada; the history of the First Nation fiscal relationship; problems with the First Nation fiscal relationship; options to improve the First Nation fiscal relationship; and First Nation and other government public finance and fiscal interests. The capstone of the course is a First Nation fiscal relations negotiation simulation and role play.
3 credits. Prerequisites: Introduction to Basic Economics or both ECON 1900 and ECON 1950

This is an on-campus class in Kamloops.

This is the fifth course of the Certificate in First Nation Applied Economics program

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Oct
31
to Nov 4

INVESTMENT FACILITATION ON FIRST NATION LANDS (APEC 2650)

Students study the interests of public and private investors and what can be done to attract investment  on First Nation lands. Given that is it four to six times more expensive to facilitate  investment for First Nation projects, emphasis is placed on solutions to reduce investment transaction costs. Topics include transaction costs and economic growth; the legal and administrative framework to facilitate investment; building infrastructure; and creating an investment facilitation work plan.
Pre-requisite: ECON 122  or ECON 1221
Co-requisite: ECON 2630 or 2631

This is an on-campus class in Kamloops. 

This is the fifth course of the Certificate in First Nation Applied Economics program. 

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Jun
6
to Jun 10

RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERCIAL DEVELOPMENT ON FIRST NATION LANDS (APEC 2640)

Students examine residential and commercial development on First Nation lands, using the Indian Act, the First Nation Fiscal Management Act (FMA), and the First Nation Land Management Act(FNLMA). Some of the legal, administrative, and financing infrastructure gaps in the Indian Act that inhibit residential and commercial development are highlighted, and strategies to overcome these legal barriers are explored. Topics include investment on First Nation lands; First Nation property rights; land management and development on First Nations lands; and a case study in First Nations development negotiations.
Pre-requisites: None

This is an on-campus class in Kamloops. 

This is the fourth course of the Certificate in First Nation Applied Economics program. 

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Feb
1
3:00 PM15:00

ECON 2630: Issues in Aboriginal Economics

The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of the First Nations’ economic issues. Examples of the types of issues that will be covered are: 1) what are the economic reasons for First Nations’ poverty? 2) why are there so many incidents of market failures within First Nations? 3) is there an economic rationale for implementing First Nations’ rights and title? and 4) is a third order of government economically feasible for First Nations? This course will benefit the student interested in First Nations’ issues, the student interested in working with First Nations, and any student interested in international trade or business ventures where indigenous interests may be involved.
Pre-requisite: ECON 122 or ECON 190 or ECON 195 (grades of C- or better), or permission of the instructor 

This class is delivered on-line. 

This is the second course of the Certificate in First Nation Applied Economics program. 

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Jan
11
to Jan 15

APEC 2700: Economic Feasibility and Impact Analysis

Students examine cost–benefit analysis and how it can be used to evaluate the economic
feasibility and impact of investments on First Nations lands. Knowledge and skills relating to the time value of money and basic statistical concepts will be developed. Topics include the investment climate and economic strategies; fiscal benefits estimates; estimating economic impacts of investment; cost-benefit analysis fundamentals; and presentation of a cost-benefit assessment.
Pre-requisite: Grades of C+ or better in Math 11 or Applications of Math 12, or MATH 051, or equivalent; ECON 122 (grade of C- or better) or ECON 190 or ECON 195 (grade of C- or better) 

This is an on-campus class in Kamloops. 

This is the last course of the Certificate in First Nation Applied Economics program. 

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Mar
2
to Mar 6

APEC 2640: Residential and Commercial Development

Students examine residential and commercial development on First Nation lands, using the Indian Act, the First Nation Fiscal Management Act (FMA), and the First Nation Land Management Act (FNLMA). Some of the legal, administrative, and financing infrastructure gaps in the Indian Act that inhibit residential and commercial development are highlighted, and strategies to overcome these legal barriers are explored. Topics include investment on First Nation lands; First Nation property rights; land management and development on First Nations lands; and a case study in First Nations development negotiations. Pre-requisites: None 

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Nov
3
to Nov 7

APEC 2650: Investment Facilitation on First Nation Lands

Students study the interests of public and private investors and what can be done to attract
investment on First Nation lands. Given that is it four to six times more expensive to facilitate investment for First Nation projects, emphasis is placed on solutions to reduce investment transaction costs. Topics include transaction costs and economic growth; the legal and administrative framework to facilitate investment; building infrastructure; and creating an investment facilitation work plan. 
Pre-requisite: ECON 122 (grade of C- or better) 
Co-requisite: ECON 263 

This the the third class in the Certificate in First Nation Applied Economics program. 

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